what is #BigData and #wolframAlpha and why its better than #Google

Good bye search engines and welcome #wolframAlpha  ,

well here goes my wish becoming true :) yes since I was a kid ( 20 years ago) I always look look at the computer as this magical machine that has all the answerers for all my questions. and as i was so bad in mathematics and statistics , i was always hoping to find answers to formulas there .Now as the term Big Data became very much like the FASHION of this new info connected world,we now have this amazing internet tool

log on http://www.wolframalpha.com

BRAIN POWER

We’ve known for a long time that interactions during the first five years of life are critical to brain development, but a new machine at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Science (I-LABS), called MEG (a powerful brain imaging machine retrofitted specially for infants), now gives us the ability to see in real-time how connections are triggered and grow through every interaction a young child has. This new technology shows us so clearly how important a child’s environment and interactions are during these early years when the brain is most malleable.

 

@ahmadesseily teaching people how to think philosophically via #الحلزونة

Now this is very much out of the box. we got used (unfortunately ) to see shows or lets be specific ( we got used to waist time on TV shows) and at the end of 1 or 2 hours of not moving your ass, you end up with ZERO new knowledge . up tell this young man came up with a small Youtube show called  #الحلزونة broadcasted on http://www.elgtv.com .

So, Ahmed El Esseily took time and went to http://www.justiceharvard.org and enjoyed 12 lectuers from Harverd talking about  Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? not only, but also he presented it with an Egyptian Twist . Amazing Job Ahmed,

 

Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

Terry Moore: Why is ‘x’ the unknown?

Why is ‘x’ the symbol for an unknown? In this short and funny talk, Terry Moore gives the surprising answer. Terry Moore is the director of the Radius Foundation, a forum for exploring and gaining insight from different worldviews

Ben Goldacre: What doctors don’t know about the drugs they prescribe

When a new drug gets tested, the results of the trials should be published for the rest of the medical world — except much of the time, negative or inconclusive findings go unreported, leaving doctors and researchers in the dark. In this impassioned talk, Ben Goldacre explains why these unreported instances of negative data are especially misleading and dangerous.

How to Spot Trends, See the Future, and Define Your Brand in the Digital Era

As I promised, I am always going to keep the main focus of this blog to Teach or Share some Knowledge. here is an amazing article i came a cross on http://www.forbes.com

It’s the hardest part of advertising: drinking in a firehose of microtrends, sifting what’s relevant, and determining how to be ahead of the cultural curve. That’s what Lucy Farey-Jones does every day as partner and Director of Brand Strategy at Venables Bell & Partners, the San Fracisco-based ad agency. How does she stay on top of new developments, without getting overly caught up in the Bay Area’s unceasing stream of tech innovations? And how does she use those insights to benefit her clients? Here are her best strategies.    Read widely. In contrast to the past, most of today’s great sources of cultural information are free or very affordable, notes Farey-Jones, who regularly consults magazines including WiredVanity Fair,Newsweek, and The Week. The only exception is the UK magazineContagious, which she says is pricey but worthwhile.

Ditch your smartphone. “I try to walk out and about when I’m traveling,” she says. “We live in a bubble in San Francisco, and it’s easy to convince yourself something happening here is a trend, when it’s not. My favorite thing is to leave my cellphone behind. It’s really hard to do, but when you do, you pay more attention to the real world. I’ve been trying to ditch it so I can have my eyes and ears open.

Ask the right questions. Too many ad agencies fixate on marketing too early in the process, says Farey-Jones. “I start with, what’s the real business problem? I phrase it as a problem, not an opportunity, because there’s more energy there. Too often, we jump to a marketing solution before we know what the business strategy is. What are we trying to do? It could be an entirely different beast than you thought in the first place.”

Focus your message. The increasingly fragmented marketplace of consumer attention has encouraged some agencies to “try 20 strategies and see which one sticks,” says Farey-Jones. But she believes it’s more important than ever to settle on “one idea – one crystal clear thought.” Otherwise, you message risks being lost or ignored.

Ask the right questions. Too many ad agencies fixate on marketing too early in the process, says Farey-Jones. “I start with, what’s the real business problem? I phrase it as a problem, not an opportunity, because there’s more energy there. Too often, we jump to a marketing solution before we know what the business strategy is. What are we trying to do? It could be an entirely different beast than you thought in the first place.”

Focus your message. The increasingly fragmented marketplace of consumer attention has encouraged some agencies to “try 20 strategies and see which one sticks,” says Farey-Jones. But she believes it’s more important than ever to settle on “one idea – one crystal clear thought.” Otherwise, you message risks being lost or ignored.

Stake out your brand turf. A particular challenge in the digital age of marketing, says Farey-Jones, is the temptation to let consumers define what your brand is. Of course consumers shape it – but it’s a company’s job to define the parameters: “I believe brand is having a strong point of view. There’s a trend in the industry where people are so desperate to mirror consumers, they forget who the brand is. It takes a brave person to say, I’ve heard the consumer, but here’s what the company was founded on, and here’s what we believe, and we’re OK with it.” If brands just emulate their consumers, she says, “you lose the identity of who you are – you’re following a series of ever-reflecting mirrors into nothingness. You have to ask, what are we bringing to the party?”

What are your techniques for trendspotting? How do you tell the difference between fads and genuine trends? And what are your secrets for defining your brand amidst today’s cluttered marketplace?

Dorie Clark is CEO of Clark Strategic Communications and the author of the forthcomingReinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future(Harvard Business Review Press, 2013). She is a strategy consultant who has worked with clients including Google, Yale University, and the Ford Foundation. Listen to her podcasts or follow her on Twitter.